Thinking Like a Dandelion: Change and Innovation

Now is a time of change. President Obama has said so and it evident in everyday news.

It is also a seminal time when the recent historic momentum was toward big companies and big governments is cresting and the impetus to devolution is emerging. The question is two fold: 1) Is this observation true and 2) What does this have to do with realizing sustainable wealth from a family business as its cornerstone?

I think so and the fact that Washington is still amassing power and centralizing the apogee of this era. But as of September 2008 the era of huge corporations with power to enjoy economic autonomy from national governments began falling apart. GM, Chrysler, Citi and other institutions began breaking apart in order to survive We are discovering the diseconomies of scale and the evolution of greater opportunities for innovative, fast moving smaller companies.

That's where the Dandelion effect comes in.  In a highly provocative article in WIRED, "Waste is Good", Chris Anderson talked about the power of waste:" When scarce resources become abundant, smart people treat them differently, exploiting them rather than conserving them. It feels wrong, but done right it can change the world".

In our blog "Innovation Basics for Presidents" we talked about quantity leads to quality (of new ideas) and looking to nature as a catalyst to innovation. The dandelion effect - named by writer Cory Doctrow - reprises the basic notion that nature is wasteful in search of better life. It is wasteful because scattershot strategies are the best way to explore uncharted territory. The dandelion tries to fill every crack in every rock with dandelions and does not try to get a perfect copy of itself. That way it finds the best growth environment. So too with business ideas.

For business owners the time is now to instill a culture of innovation and pursue new opportunities during these watershed years. Just as cost control is a key discipline or supply chain management, so is innovation in terms of wealth creation.

Returning to centralization of power in Washington, in a  compelling essay by Paul Starobin in WSJ "Divided We Stand" http://online.wsj.com/article /SB10001424052970204482304574219813708759806.html forcefully argues that the devolution of USA is an incipient trend: "Devolved America is a vision faithful both to certain postindustrial realities as well as to the pluralistic heart of the American political tradition...a tradition betrayed by  creeping centralization of power in Washington...".

He asks us to "...Picture an America that is run not, as now, by a top-heavy Washington autocracy, but in freewheeling style, by an asemblage of largely autonomous regional replublcs reflecting the eclectic economic and cultural character of the society."

I believe these are mega trends business owners need to think about. I think we need to be prepared to ride the wave of change by fostering innovative, highly adaptable customer focused companies. This is the platform to create and sustain wealth during the 21st Century.

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

This is really thought-provoking. You make a great point that being able to adapt to the environment we are in is critical to a company surviving and thriving. I look forward to sharing this with my clients.

Verify your Comment

Previewing your Comment

This is only a preview. Your comment has not yet been posted.

Working...
Your comment could not be posted. Error type:
Your comment has been saved. Comments are moderated and will not appear until approved by the author. Post another comment

The letters and numbers you entered did not match the image. Please try again.

As a final step before posting your comment, enter the letters and numbers you see in the image below. This prevents automated programs from posting comments.

Having trouble reading this image? View an alternate.

Working...

Post a comment

Comments are moderated, and will not appear until the author has approved them.